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Lesson 2: People on Location´s archives ↓

Lesson 2: Page 01

Dine and Dash

The reality of commercial photography work is that you occasionally do not have time to do everything that you want to do with a photo setup. This is often the result of the client not having the budget to pay you for the time it would take to do the shots ‘properly’, meaning lighting and composing for a nice photo.  Sometimes the client cannot The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 2: Page 02

Non strobe lighting

Not all lighting you will use needs to be done with strobes. I have a duffel bag full of Lightform panels with shoot through, highly reflective white and metallic surface materials to create a variety of reflected light.The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 2: Page 03

FLASH FILL

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Lesson 2: Page 04

FLASH KEY OUTDOORS

Flash Key outdoors is a fun and useful lighting technique you may find useful. The difference with this technique over flash fill is that the strobe becomes the key light, basically overriding the ambient and the ambient in effect becomes the fill. This is easily done by creative use of the shutter speed and f/stop combinations. Remember, the

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Lesson 2: Page 05

Simulating Sunlight

Another trick I have used many times when the light isn’t what I want is to use flash to fake sunlight. In this example of a couple at a golf course, taken for a magazine, you couldn’t ask for a greyer day. So I set up my flash on a light stand, camera right, and added a 3401 gel to the flash.

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Lesson 2: Page 06


INDOOR AMBIENT LIGHT: CHOOSING NOT TO USE IT.

The reason I am discussing whether or not to use ambient light is because indoor ambient light is usually a different color than your strobes. This creates new challenges that are covered later in the bonus lesson. But the thing to remember is if you have a choice to light a scene with strobes and do it well, then there is no need to allow the ambientThe content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 2: Page 07

Next was to set up lights and place them where I needed light to come from. As I visualized this shot my first idea was how should the top of the table look? I wanted directional light with shadows coming from the side to light the items on the table and the apron around the table. The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 2: Page 08

For this image, which was a product photo for the company that makes these adjustable steps for mechanics to stand on, I could have used ambient light. Again, the ceiling lights are not daylight balanced and would cause a color shift, so for this photo it is easy to use only strobes. At about 3:00 I placed a 60” white umbrella and pointed it at him for an edge light and to light the large tool box and wall.

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Lesson 2: Page 09



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Lesson 2: Page 10

LIGHT FALLOFF

In this image from a door manufacturing company, I again chose to not use the ambient light because they were sodium vapor way up in the ceiling. Sodium vapor lights are very orange when exposed on daylight film/capture and usually are so high up they create a very contrasty light. This shot was lit with 3 strobes. The first thing I did was roll all those doors into place in the background and the reason is it eliminated the need to put lights way back there (remember: no black holes or black backgrounds) and

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