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Lesson 4: Fun With Flash´s archives ↓

Lesson 4: Page 01

In previous lessons, we have explored the many ways to use flash both on-camera and off. For our last lesson, we’ll look at fun ways to continue to get creative using flash. The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 4: Page 02

These two photos below are a perfect example of panning with the subject and flashing to put an edge on the subject. If you look at the blurry background and feet on the subject, you can imagine how much of a blurry blob the subject would be without the flash. I placed my feet in a solid position, lock my elbows against my waist, and rotate at the hips trying to keep my AF point right on his helmet. This insures that the head is in focus and the flash will meter at this point for accurate exposure.The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 4: Page 03

In this image of a mountain biker, I set the camera at -1 EC to darken the background and make the flash stand out better. Then I just panned with him and again, keeping the AF point at the same spot on his body.

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Lesson 4: Page 04

Stop Action

The idea here as previously mentioned, is to stop or freeze the action WITH FLASH and not necessarily the shutter speed and there are two ways to do it: shutter speed and flash or flash only. The decision is based on the level of ambient light. The idea here is that you can stop a subject with shutter speed and we do that all the time. But it is the times when you cannot get a fast shutter that flash helps you freeze the subject. This could be a basketball player frozen in air by flash and with no blur. A fast shutter speed is required, but the approach is pretty much the same. You can zoom in or pan with your subject. I usually use no slower than 1/125th to stop action, but prefer to use 1/250 , my fastest sync speed. The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 4: Page 05

I have always enjoyed the idea of hide-a-flash in places that create light and result in a cool effect. The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 4: Page 06

Using Flash in Mixed Lighting

So your boss knows you are a good photographer and wants pictures from in the warehouse of a group of employees. You know you need flash because it is kind of dark and you also remember Charlie saying that black backgrounds make lousy pictures and you want to impress the boss with your skills.The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 4: Page 07

Here is an example showing Kelvin temperature color relationship:

Amber    warmer     warm    Daylight     cool      cooler   blueish     blue

3200K     3800K     4500K   5500K       6200k     6800    7500K     8000KThe content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 4: Page 08

Mixed Lighting Summary

If you took the picture now in tungsten light everything would be off color. To correct the photo you now need to go to your camera and adjust for the off color ambient light. By adding the appropriate gel, you have made your flash the same color as the ambient, but you must eliminate that color shift with the camera as well. You can do this a couple ways depending on your camera. Some have presets for Fluorescents, Tungsten, and so on. Pick the appropriate one or use the even simpler technique of Auto White Balance (AWB). Your flash and ambient are the same color and the camera in AWB eliminates the color shift and your pictures will be perfectly color balanced. For those who enjoy working with Custom White Balance, that is also an option.The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 4: Page 09

More fun with colored gels

Rosco also makes colored gels that are for coloring a light rather than correcting light as in the previous section. I use these all the time to color my lights for fun effects. You can buy this swatch book at the same time you buy the other.  The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 4: Page 10

More color tips

There are some color techniques you cannot achieve with your AWB in camera and the photo right is the perfect example. When I shoot landscapes at sunset, I will often add a Kodak .20 Magenta Filter to my lens to achieve a purplish ‘dusky’ color sky. In the case of this photo taken on assignment, I used that filter on the camera lens and it turned the entire scene a light magenta. The problem is that I am taking a picture of this couple and they would turn Magenta as well.The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

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