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Lesson 3: Off-Camera Flash´s archives ↓

Lesson 3: Page 01

Off Camera Flash

So far we have covered many different ways you can use your flash on-camera such as bounce and diffused flash and hopefully you have mastered those. Now we will explore numerous ways to effectively use flash off-camera. There are basically two ways to use flash off camera: TTL and non-TTL (aka Manual Flash). You can use a Dedicated Flash Cord between your flash and camera and still have all the TTL features available or you can use your flash in a wireless capacity using either the infra red technology built into the flash or separate radio triggers.

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Lesson 3: Page 02

When using the flash off-camera, you need to trigger the flash to fire from your camera. In the previous pictures, I am using a Dedicated Flash Cord that allows me the use of TTL and this keeps the camera and flash communicating to create a perfectly exposed picture. This dedicated cord however, only stretches to about 3’ so if I want my light further away I would need to switch to a different method and the first we’ll look at is a Sync Cord extension. Here is a cord that goes to 33′ and is an option. (Before you race out to buy one hold off for the remainder of this lesson where we will discuss wireless triggers.)The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 3: Page 03

Optical Slaves – cont.

Most older, yet state of the art flash units do not come with a PC sync socket on them to plug that slave into with the exception of the 580EXII, 600EX-RT and the SB900. Both manufacturers added those back into the latest models.The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 3: Page 04

Dedicated Wireless

Some of today’s state-of-the-art flash units come with wireless flash ability built in. Canon’s 430EXII and 580EXII are three of them while Nikon’s SB 900 and SB700 compliment their line. They have the ability to trigger many more flash units that are compatible with the system. Check your manual here to determine if your camera has this ability.

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Lesson 3: Page 05

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Lesson 3: Page 06

SETTING THE CHANNELS

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Lesson 3: Page 07

Radio Remotes Triggers

There are numerous methods for triggering flash using wireless radio technology. There are a number of third party systems designed for wireless triggering and originally most were designed with the studio strobe systems in mind, but the explosive popularity of off-camera flash systems, many have reinvented their products with flash in mind and new companies have sprung up as well. The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 3: Page 08

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Lesson 3: Page 09

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Lesson 3: Page 10

 Portraits using Flash

There is no difference between shooting portraits with studio strobes versus flash units as far as the approach to lighting. The advantage to flash is the compact nature of the lighting equipment required to do the job. I have had many portrait sessions for companies that were just head shots so I don’t need a lot of gear. Or if you are flying somewhere the potential over weight aspect of lighting with strobes can be quite costly. Using compact flash units is easy to schlepp around and is easier to set up to now be overweight with the airlines. The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

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