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Lesson 2: On-Camera Flash´s archives ↓

Lesson 2: Page 01

The Power of ETTL

What makes flash photography so easy is the power of ETTL. (iTTL on Nikons) This function of your flash and camera working together can in most cases, provide you perfectly ‘flashed’ pictures. You simply set the flash to ETTL and choose the shooting mode you want to use on the camera. No matter what shooting mode you choose, your flash will output the necessary amount of flash for a correct flash exposure. No matter whether you choose P mode, AP, SP, or M modes, the flash is in automatic and sends out the correct flash to your subject because its job is to output light based on the chosen f-stop. It does not care what shooting mode you are in because shooting modes only control background exposure. 

In this lesson we are going to look at a few more options available on many of today’s state-of-the-art flashes including some fun shooting techniques such as Flash Key, Flash Fill, and Bounce Flash.

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Lesson 2: Page 02

Flash Range-The Math

Each flash unit has a certain range of flash ability based on the total power it can produce. This means based on the manufacturers designation for that specific flash model, that you can blast light from the flash to a certain distance and achieve an acceptably exposed picture.  Think back and you may remember; the higher the Guide Number the more flash output ability and the higher the flash output, the greater range or distance the flash can travel to your subject. Also, the lower the flash range the less distance the flash can send light and the pop-up flash is a great example of this.The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 2: Page 03

Flash Range – cont.
If you have little experience using your flash unit and are photographing your child’s school play and have set the camera to f/22 because the camera sales person said all your pictures will be great, you will be disappointed. The first thing you notice while chimping to make sure you got the shot, is they are all dark pictures. The flash never reached your child up on stage singing and dancing. A recalculation is in order, so first, determine how far you think you are out there in the audience, from your child on stage? The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 2: Page 04

Flash Range in TTL

Each flash unit has a certain range of flash ability based on the total power it has. Remember, the higher the Guide Number the more flash output and the greater range that it can send light emitted from the flash. The range of your flash is important for a number of reasons.

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Lesson 2: Page 05

ISO

We just looked at ISO and its effects on flash range, but here is a bit more info. The ISO setting on your camera can extend the range of your flash just as it contributes to faster shutter speed and f/stop combinations in normal outdoor shooting. For example, if your camera is set to ISO 100 and the exposure combination for your subject happens to be 1/60th @ f/11, when you change the ISO to 200, your exposure combination changes as well and you could use either 1/125th @ f/11 or 1/60th @ f/16th. You can use this to extend the range of your flash unit also.  The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 2: Page 06

There could also be situations when an increase of flash output may be suitable for an ‘over-flashed’ look. FEC is adjustable usually in 1/3 stop increments, but some flashes are ½ stop. Keep in mind that FEC only controls the output from the flash and does not affect other exposure settings on the camera for background or ambient light and exposure. The way you use this feature will vary by camera and you must check your owner’s manual. For the sake of demonstration I will describe it using my Canon. You can set the FEC anywhere between -2 stops to +2 stops and in 1/3 increments.The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 2: Page 07

FL240 fulll flashFL241 -1 flash FL242 -2 flash

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Lesson 2: Page 08

FEC Exercise

Here is an exercise for helping understand FEC better. Have a person or subject stand in the garage with the garage door open and lights off. You want bright light outside but not entering the garage or hitting the subject. Meter for the outside light and adjust the cameras settings as such for proper exposure for the outside. With flash off take a test exposure and the subject should be close to silhouette. Now turn on the flash and take another picture with no FEC meaning ZEROED. Next take another picture with -1 FEC and another at +1 FEC. Your four pictures should show no flash with the silhouette, a proper flash exposure, an exposure where the subject looks under-flashed, and the last where the subject looks over-flashed.The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 2: Page 09

Exercise:

To test your flash and camera system, place the focus point on the subject and take a fully flash image. Take a second exposure by placing the AF point on the background (background should be at least 10’ further). Compare the two images. If they look like above then your camera is metering the flash off the selected AF point. If they look the same, the flash is using an evaluative form of measurement. The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 2: Page 10

Another method is the red eye reduction features of your system.  The camera, as you are pressing the shutter release, fires a small flash-type light to get the pupils in the eye to close down from the brightness. The flash then fires the full amount of flash for the picture and usually the red eye problem is gone.red eye The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

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