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Lesson 4: Advanced Techniques´s archives ↓

Lesson 4: Page 01

We have covered so far, how to shoot a variety of products made from many different materials. As you progress in product photography, you may have times when a client requests a setup that goes beyond a basic product photo. This could include creating a scene that looks realistic and believable and portrays the product as if it was photographed in a real location. Here is where you enter into set building or creating believable scenarios in which to place a product. You may also be asked to visit a client’s facility to photograph products that cannot be delivered to you for the studio. Other clients may make a product that does not exist in physical form, such as a software producer. In this lesson we will look at how to tackle products in the studio as well as creating sets that appear as if on location. And later in the lesson, we’ll cover techniques for composting multiple exposures, allowing you to create photographs that are difficult or impossible to catch in one capture.The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 4: Page 02

Shooting Shoes

You can create an amazing amount of realistic scenarios in the smallest of shooting spaces. The idea is to not have to go to a real location, particularly outdoors, where you have no control over outdoor light. In the studio you have total control.  For example, large furniture companies rarely shoot their products in someone’s home. There is usually not enough space and other contingencies that would make that difficult. Instead, they find a large studio that specializes in furniture and has many of the necessary abilities to create the scene. They will have props such as lamps and dressers and the ability to build a real looking ‘fake’ wall to setup behind the couch to give the illusion that it is a real house.

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Lesson 4: Page 03

In yet another setup for Nike, they wanted this hiking boot shot in a more rugged looking set. The first thing I set up was a black seamless rolled across a folding table. In our studio prop closet were these pieces of stone slabs that were acquired for another shoot way back and have been used in many others since. You can get rock and stone at local stone supplier. The leaves, also in our prop closet, were from the arts and craft store where they provide crafters who make Thanksgiving crafts.

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Lesson 4: Page 04

Knockout Products with Drop Shadow

I had a client who wanted a bunch of apparel shot to be used for their e-commerce website. They also wanted all the images knocked out of the background, meaning make it pure white, and add a drop shadow. The shooting setup was quite simple and consisted of one light and white fill cards.  You can see the light box (next page) on the side with one card leaning against a light stand and another leaning against the ladder I was using to get above the products and shoot down.The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 4: Page 05

 

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Lesson 4: Page 06

Next, I use the Opacity slider for the shadow layer and reduce it to 50% and the shadow appears more faint and pleasing.The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 4: Page 07

The Magazine Muffin Shoot

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Lesson 4: Page 08

So I added to Curves Adjustment Layers, filled them with black and set ones Blend Mode to Screen and the other to Multiply. The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 4: Page 09

Tech Product Shoot

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Lesson 4: Page 10

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