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Lesson 25 Advanced Corporate´s archives ↓

Lesson 25: Page 01

Lesson 25: Page 02

Up to this point, we have covered the basics of many different subjects, products and places and how to shoot and light them. Corporate and industrial is one of the most challenging and I love it! Unlike many other subjects where you can move the product around, shine and polish, place people as you wish, or build a set, corporate and industrial is often a search the for the best spot to shoot in an ugly environment. Dirty filthy machines and work environments, grungy workers, and poorly lit environments will challenge you to produce and create a beautiful product that shows your clients operations.The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 25: Page 03

Working in Tight Spaces

Occasionally you will need to work in spaces that have no room to place lights. Here is an example of one such location. I was asked to photograph this board of directors for their annual report and the location that we were asked to shoot in was this meeting room in one of their branches where they were all gathering for a board meeting.The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 25: Page 04

This image represents another example of having to light a tight spot. The client asked that we shoot electrical conduit installation and as always, I seek the most dramatic angle I can. All the installation was taking place between the full wall left and half wall right. This presented lighting challenges.The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 25: Page 05

I chose to place the people for a strong composition with the main guy fully in front and the assistant behind, smaller, yet still prominent. Then the other technician in the rear carefully positioned.The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 25: Page 06

Bad Ambient Light Isn’t Always Bad

As I mentioned in the color lesson #7, sometimes it is fun and creative to leave some of the ambient color shift in the image and here is an example. This company is in the industrial billet business and wanted a shot of their billet before shipping. This facility has horrible overhead lighting that was close to sodium vapor, but seemed even more amber/orange. It was tough correcting for it.The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 25: Page 07

Making the Star of the Shot Anonymous

This corporate assignment required to actually hide the star of the shot or the process. There were reasons for this: they did not want the public to see the part, the test process, or the custom die used to test the components. The facilities manager also wanted to see the shot before I left for approval.The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 25: Page 08

When do you need LOTSA lights?  There will be some assignments that require you to have a lot of lights to pull off a nice shot. Here is one example.The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 25: Page 09

This was another tough shot to pull off for the same client. The goal is to take a dark theater and add enough light for detail to make the photo read well, yet make it look like a theater and without having light hit the screen and wash it out. So placement of the lights was tricky. I started with the light up front to light the guy in front of the screen and I chose a grid spot on him. I also had an umbrella right behind the grid to light the group at the table. I also used a grid on the folks at the table to make sure their faces were bright and the umbrella was a fill light.The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 25: Page 10

The Paper Mill

This image was shot in a paper mill. We wanted a strong composition and I chose this angle for the drama of the rollers coming out of the foreground and leading to these guys.

The newsprint paper here was running at several thousand RPM’s so I was not able to get to close. If I touched the paper and it ripped or drop anything on the paper, it would ruin these rollers and cost about $40,000 to fix. I was paranoid! The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

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