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Lesson 20 Outdoor Adventure´s archives ↓

Lesson 20: Page 01

Lesson 20: Page 02

We launched our rafts into the swift moving current and grabbed the paddles to navigate the raft to river left and quickly line up for the first rapid. The snow had changed to rain as it hovered around 34 degrees. My excitement to be on a river adventure occasionally gave way to more rational thinking of “what the heck am I doing here?” It was the middle of February, dead of winter, and I had just launched onto Oregon’s Rogue River with my professional river guide friends. This was their winter break, a crazy getaway that was in stark contrast to their summer jobs guiding on the river wearing shorts and Teva’s.  I was all cozy warm, for the moment, in my synthetic long johns, fleece outer wear and full dry suit. The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 20: Page 03

The business of the outdoors is huge! There are so many activities from fishing, skiing, biking, wilderness activities, and much more; that have products manufactured for the activity and editorial publications representing each. If there is any specific are you enjoy like skiing or fishing as examples, why not photograph them? You can create very marketable stock photography and also approach and work for the product manufacturers who make the skies, boots, poles, apparel, fishing poles, reels, hip-boots, hats, gloves, tackle, and……………………..The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 20: Page 04

Other activities can be successfully photographed by photographers who are more observers where they stand back and shoot the action as it happens. These would be sports such as rafting, canoeing, camping, sailing, biking, scuba diving, backpacking, fishing, and many more. This lesson will cover shooting adventure as stock and on assignment.The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 20: Page 05

Years ago, when I had created a worthy portfolio of adventure images, I went to one manufacturer and borrowed their clothing. I hired four models and put the companies clothing on them and we headed into the mountains for four days.  While we camped in the mountains, we shot camping, canoeing, mountain biking, hiking and backpacking, and some lifestyle images.  The company used so many images in their next three catalogs my invoice for stock photo usage was $18,000. The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 20: Page 06

So rather than trying to shoot a little of many subjects, you should concentrate on one or a couple activities that are easy for you to engage in and shoot away building a decent file of images. Enter this field only if it interests you since you will need to purchase props and use models. The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 20: Page 07

Set the tent up in your backyard,  pick a manual power setting on your flash. I chose ¼ power. Then with the camera on a tripod, I shoot a test exposure at f/4, f/5.6, f/8, f/11, f/16.  I then determine which f/stop is the best tent exposure, lets say f/8, and whenever I take that tent out, I know that the exposure will be f/8 with the flash at ¼ power in that tent. You then bracket your shutter speed during the shoot to get some darker and some lighter. The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 20: Page 08

These are things that are required for shooting adventure sports. I have the equipment to shoot everything from backpacking to large family campouts and many other setups. If I hire a model to be in a shot and she doesn’t have the attire that I want in the scene, I need to have it myself.  I also purchase all this gear through my business so it is tax deductable. The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 20: Page 09

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Lesson 20: Page 10

When you are on an adventure, possibly as a paying guest, your goal is to capture the essence of the adventure.  Your pictures need to tell us what the trip was about.  Was it cold or hot?  Physically demanding, or laid back and relaxing? You need to show the emotions of the participants as they experience the highs and lows of the adventure.  Show the exhilaration and excitement of splashing through a wild whitewater rapid, or the physical anguish of trying to make a difficult rock climbing move. You should also document the enjoyment of a fabulous cooked meal often provided on guided trips. Look for the scenic beauty of a tent against a spectacular backdrop, and the lighthearted moments of people having a great time. The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

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