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Lesson 15 Advanced Studio Portrature´s archives ↓

Lesson 15: Page 01

Lesson 15: Page 02

ADVANCED PORTRAIT TECHNIQUES

I had an assignment from a client who wanted to shoot an ad that used the size comparison of two heads with hard hats to illustrate the point. The client brought two employees of the company to model and several different sized hard hats.

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Lesson 15: Page 03

Now here is the tricky part! Look at the hammer in this next image. Notice how bright the head of the hammer is? Now look at the shadow side of his face. Two very different brightness levels! How do you light a hammer so brightly and not have that light affect The shadow side of his face? Here is the trick: the hammer is shiny and reflective and we cover more of this in our upcoming product sessions. You light metal with reflections! What that means is what you show the metal, it ‘sees’ in the form of a reflection. Just like a mirror. So you are not really lighting the hammer, rather reflecting light into it.The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 15: Page 04

To get the perspective as shown in the layout, a 250mm lens was required. I explained this to the client that even at f/22 set on my lens, I would not get all 5 people sharp with a 250mm lens. The second problem is each person’s individual height. The layout the client sent me, showed everyone at the same height and I knew all to well that these 5 people would be different heights. The client really wanted to have just one photo of all five because it is cheaper to work with one scan than 5 scans. I suggested, just to be safe, that we shoot a group photo of all 5, then each individually as a backup.The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 15: Page 05

Over and Under

Here are two approaches to glamour style lighting.  The portrait on left was shot using two light boxes; a large box right above camera and a small box right under camera at -1/2 stop. I also used a small light box on a boom above and slightly behind her head to create a very broad hair light. I also used a Nikon Soft 1 diffusion filter.  The right image was shot using a 72×72” Lightform ‘shoot through’ diffusion panel which created a huge soft light source. The panel was behind the camera which meant I stood in front of it with camera.
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Lesson 15: Page 06

This photo represents a glamor technique widely used among photographers. It starts with two key lights, small strip lights on each side of the camera and close to it. Both lights are at equal power to provide a directional yet soft light. If you look at the catch light you see two strip highlights indicating this technique was used.The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 15: Page 07

These three images show this technique as used on Chelsea. A very nice soft light quality with minimal shadows.The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 15: Page 08

I remembered a photo taken by one of my fellow classmates while I was in photography school of this cute 15 year old teenage girl in Santa Barbara. The cute teenager later became known as super model Kathy Ireland.

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Lesson 15: Page 09

I took the image into PS and began cleaning of the face and wrinkles, added eye shadow and cheek color, brightened the lips, colored the eyes. I also used curves to whiten the paper underneath and that helped remove the paper wrinkles.The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 15: Page 10

I also used a cutter card. A cutter card is a black piece of foam core (or something else) that is either huge or small. The purpose of a cutter card is to block light that is hitting the subject from hitting the background. So you place the cutter card between the key light and background and slide it in and out until you have the light blocked satisfactorily. If you look at the darker right side and shadow on the floor that is from using a cutter card. The last light was a grid on the wall.  I then completed my technique in the darkroom with adding some diffusion.The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

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