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Lesson 12 Digital Workflow´s archives ↓

Lesson 12: Page 01

Lesson 12: Page 02

You have been out traveling widely, shooting plenty of fantastic images, and now are ready to cash the checks that will be pouring in from the sales of your stock or getting paid for your assignment. If only it was that easy! In reality, you must first have a business with an OPEN sign and customers to buy your product.

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Lesson 12: Page 03

Similarly, I had an annual report client that I traveled for and would shoot their manufacturing facilities. Sometimes this would be a two week trip and at a new location each day. We would shoot machines and processes with operators and when I delivered film I would need to provide the client the location, the process, the operators name, and any identifiable parts they were manufacturing. To keep track we shot Polaroid tests and would then identify the image such as the process and parts photographed, by writing on the back of the Polaroid. Then that Polaroid was placed in a Ziploc baggy with the rolls of film from that same shot.

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Lesson 12: Page 04

There are plenty of programs out there, some costly and some cheap, and it will be well worth your while to research these carefully. You may buy the program in the beginning and get volumes of your digital assets organized only to find a much better program down the road that will make your job much easier but requires you to start all over. Certainly you want to avoid that.  This has happened to me several times. When I started shooting and organizing my slide files I bought a DOS based program called Phototrack. I used this software for years as did thousands of other photographers. You entered the caption information and a starting category number for the image, then entered how many of each image that caption would apply to and hit go. The software would then print out a specified amount of labels on a dot matrix printer with the same captions and consecutive numbers for each of the transparencies. You then peeled and applied the labels. It worked wonderfully.

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Lesson 12: Page 05

EDITING

After returning to the office you want to immediately remove the bad images such as those with obvious technical problems. Consider: Is the image properly exposed? Are the images sharp? Did you capture the peak action? Are there any eyes closed? Is the wardrobe correct? Are they well composed? Does the lighting compliment the image and subject?The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 12: Page 06

Here is an example of a horizontal image cropped and used vertically on a magazine cover. It was an original 4 x 5 transparency. Sharpness here is critical for this image to have the resolution needed for this magnification. For you to get a similar reproduction with a digital file it must be absolutely tack sharp and also photographed with a very high resolution digital camera.The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 12: Page 07

better position, but dad is still hidden. The third image has dad in a perfect position, but mom and the child’s paddles are not in the best position. Image 4 is perfect and the keeper; the child’s and mom’s paddles are in opposite positions of each other and active looking. Dad is in a perfect spot in back with nothing interfering with him.The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 12: Page 08

RETOUCHING

All your images need to be processed and retouched. This is primarily to set contrast and color due to a RAW file being really pretty poor. It is also to remove dust specks that were on the digital sensor (older dSLR’s) but also to set white and black points and any contrast that might be needed and whatever else you wish to do.  This basic retouching is boring and time consuming, yet mandatory. One way to save time here is to batch the RAW files in Adobe camera raw. As long as the images are the same you can often retouch in one file and sync with the rest and this saves time.

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Lesson 12: Page 09

METADATA

Every digital photograph’s file contains far more information, known as metadata, than just the picture itself. Most digital cameras apply metadata to the image when it is captured including details about how the picture was taken such as camera model, f-stop, shutter speed, ISO, color temperature, lens, and other settings. Some even include GPS data. But metadata can contain much more valuable information with each picture. Photographers can use metadata fields to add or save copyright status, copyright owner, a caption, how the picture has been used and by whom, licensing issues, keywords, categories, and much more. Why is metadata crucial to photography? Because it is used by search engines and photo management programs to help you find your pictures. If your website contains images rich with metadata, especially your stock files, this can aid a client searching for an image you may have.The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 12: Page 10

There are numerous drop down menus that provide the metadata from image capture. Only the IPTC is editable. (Depending on your version of Bridge, the templates may look different.)The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

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