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Lesson 09 Introduction to Flash Photography´s archives ↓

Lesson 9: Page 1

Lesson 9: Page 2

LESSON 1 UNDERSTANDING FLASH

In a perfect world for photography, every photograph we take would have perfect light, the perfect subject, perfect exposure, resulting in the perfect photograph. However, as you know there is nothing perfect in our world including the conditions, in which we photograph. Fortunately, there are tools available that allow us to capture pictures that may appear close to perfect and flash is one of them. The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 9: Page 3

E-TTL/iTTL also has the ability to make subtle changes in output for flash fill techniques. To add even more ability to flash evolution, Canon added a great feature called AIM (Advanced Integrated Multi Point Control System,) which allows the camera to favor flash exposure where the focus point is set for more accurate exposure with off-center subjects. This type of technology is also seen in the Nikon equipment. (Please read your manual for specifics). What this means is that whichever auto focus point you have set in the cameras viewfinder in where the flash will measure for proper flash output.The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 9: Page 4

Important Point: To emphasize this point again; the shutter opens and the flash fires. Because the flash duration is so fast, the shutter remains open after the flash has fired to capture the ambient light. This also means that the shutter speed is ONLY for changing the exposure of the ambient or background light. It does not change the flash exposure.
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Lesson 9: Page 5

The Reality

Now before moving on I should clarify the previous paragraphs as correct flash theory, because it is theory and it’s based on manual flash. The reality is when you are in TTL automatic flash; the flash will adjust its light output automatically to any changes in f-stop you have made. So if you move the f-stop from f8 to f11, the flash will automatically double flash output for a correct exposure at f11. If you adjust from f8 to f5.6, the flash will reduce by half the amount of output for a proper exposure. It’s this function that makes flash so easy to use: TTL does all the work.The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 9: Page 6

I need to mention this now: if you have a newer camera, you might have an option in your menu that is called Auto FP with FP meaning Focal Plane. It should be called, Auto High Speed Sync because that is what it is about. If you turn this on you can shoot flash pictures at any speed like 1/1000 or 1/8000 and at anytime. You can go your merry way never thinking about sync speed ever again. (Gee that sounds good!) There is a problem with this however (covered more in a later lesson.)

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Lesson 9: Page 7

Shooting modes

Cameras meter flash and ambient light independently of each other. Your camera probably comes with several different shooting modes. On Canons: P for Program, Av for Aperture Priority, Tv for Shutter Priority and M for Manual. On Nikons: S is for Shutter Priority, A for Aperture Priority, P for Program, and M for Manual. From here on I will just refer to these modes as AP=Aperture Priority, SP=Shutter Priority, M = Manual, P = Program mode.The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 9: Page 8

A mode, which stands for Aperture Priority allows you to select the f/stop you wish to use, while the camera selects the appropriate shutter speed based on its metering of the ambient light. The f/stop you choose could be based on the amount of depth of field you wish to have in your subject. The shutter speed chosen by the camera is designed to accommodate the aperture you have chosen. It could range from 30 seconds to the faster flash sync speed. This is an important consideration, since too slow of a shutter speed could require a tripod to avoid movement and blur.The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 9: Page 9

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Lesson 9: Page 10

EC, aka Exposure Compensation

Exposure Compensation is used to increase or decrease your exposure beyond what the camera recommends and it has nothing to do with flash exposure. If you have heard the term “bracket your exposure” they are referring to compensating the exposure. Anytime you are out photographing and bracket your exposures by shooting at the The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

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