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Lesson 06 Introduction to Location Lighting´s archives ↓

Lesson 6: Page 1

Lesson 6: Page 2

As you begin your commercial photography business you will be asked to photograph on location. There is a huge variety of different assignments you may be asked to do and this will require you to have a variety of equipment, plenty of lights, and the ability to solve many photographic problems. Your business will depend on it. The difference with location lighting is that you now are lighting ‘scenes’ rather than just a person or an object. You will still light the person or object, but also need to light the scene around the subject and often this scene supports the subject. This lesson will take a broad look at different approaches to the wide variety of situations you may encounter.The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 6: Page 3

Dine and Dash

The reality of commercial photography work is that you occasionally do not have time to do everything that you want to do with a photo setup. This is often the result of the client not having the budget to pay you for the time it would take to do the shots ‘properly’, meaning lighting and composing for a nice photo.

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Lesson 6: Page 4

This older pictures is a great example of using one of my White Lightning as a bounce off a white ceiling and using no ambient light because of not wanting to deal with color balance issues.

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Lesson 6: Page 5

Depending on the shot you need to get, you may choose to use ambient light or you may not and you need a clear idea of why you would want to choose one option over the other.The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 6: Page 6

This series shows strobes on the machine and different shutter speeds. Below is f/11 @ 1/15 and this exposure is perfect for the strobe lights but does not allow the ambient light to have any affect on the lighting of the machine-the background is dark.The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 6: Page 7

well, then there is no need to allow the ambient light to play a part in the photo, but it must look real and if using ambient light will make it look more real, then that is the way to go. If you are using all strobes then your shutter speed will be fast, if you allow ambient to mix with your strobe, you are using a longer shutter speed.The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 6: Page 8

Here is an example of being forced to use the ambient light. There is no way I could light this whole area for a real lighting look. This location is for one of my clients remodeling an old Costco into a industrial casting company. The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 6: Page 9

The first image here is way over exposed for the window and ok for shadow detail. The second image is perfect for the window, but the table is to dark. However, this is where you stop testing and begin with adding the lights to the scene because you were testing for the window exposure and image 2 looks great.

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Lesson 6: Page 10

I had another light that acted as fill light and it was near the camera. You can see the table in the lower left corner. I would have preferred that this light was more to the right (from this angle) then it would be pointing right at the side of the table facing the camera, but it reflected in the glass. An Angle of Incidence (A of I) issue!The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

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