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Lesson 05 Intro to Studio Products´s archives ↓

Lesson 5: Page 1

Lesson 5: Page 2

Product photography is everywhere in our lives, everywhere we look, everywhere we go. Magazines, brochures, the web, and advertisements all show products for sale. All these products were photographed in a manner to make them appeal to the buying public and get them to purchase the product.  There are lots of lighting techniques, tips, and tricks that you can use to create good images to sell products.

Product photography is done in the studio and on location.  Clients will bring products to your studio where you have full control over how you shoot it. Occasionally there will be products that cannot be brought to the studio and you must be prepared with the right equipment and skills to photograph on location. For this lesson we will look primarily at basic technique’s for studio product photography.The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 5: Page 3

Here is a close up of one method to hang your background on the poles. I purchased a 10’ electrical conduit from Home Depot. It is tapered on one end so that it will insert into another conduit and extend as long and as many pieces as the electrician needs. Here, I bought one and cut it in half so that it will fit in the car for location shoots. The tapered end now inserts into the open end of the other piece and it is sturdy for a role of paper and will not sag like commercial background kits when you hang a muslin or canvas background on it. I then place two large spring clamps onto the top of the stand and lay the pole into the V of the clamps handle.The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 5: Page 4

This is a very simple setup and an example where overhead light is not always necessary. I set up a large light box on a stand and placed it camera right. The bottom of the light box is about 8” off the The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 5: Page 5

Here is an example of the steps just described:

Feathered towards background

On this image, the light box is feathered towards the background. Notice how much brighter the background is. The front of the product has not changed much either.

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Lesson 5: Page 6

Larger fill card

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Lesson 5: Page 7

Reflections and Highlights

Most objects you photograph will be illuminated by reflections you place strategically just like above. This is deliberate control of highlights and most of the time this is controlled by your key light.  However, you will need to add secondary reflections on many shiny subjects by adding more lights, fill cards, foil boards, and so on. Since these key light reflections or highlights usually need to be large, the size of your key light source is important. Remember; big highlights require big light sources. The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 5: Page 8

 

'Jury rigged' reflector setup

This  photo is an example of making a custom size reflector to create a custom highlight on a product. This small piece of foil board is attached to the clamp which is duct taped to a piece of armature wire that is attached to a weight from an old body building weight set. The armature wire allows for you to easily move a highlight around by bending the wire. There are commercial devices out there like the Plamp system here.The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 5: Page 9

 

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Lesson 5: Page 10

The Climbing Equipment Co.

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