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Lesson 04 More Studio Portraits´s archives ↓

Lesson 4: Page 1

Lesson 4: Page 2

LIGHT FALLOFF AND FEATHERING LIGHT

Most light modifiers will have some falloff from side to side. This means that the center of an umbrella for example, produces brighter light in the center and begins to falloff around the outer edges. Light modifier manufacturers advertise their products and often boast about “minimal falloff” from their products.The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 4: Page 3

BUSINESS PORTRAITS

Business portraits, like any portrait sitting, can be as simple or complex as you wish. The majority of portraits I do in the studio for business people are usually really simple portraits. Occasionally, they are much more complex and some of those will be demonstrated in a later lesson.The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 4: Page 4

Occasionally you might have a client who requests a ‘animated’ portrait with a knockout background. When I describe Animated, I am referring to an approach where the subject is not posed in a formal manner but is animated.The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 4: Page 5

FAMILIES

When you open your portrait studio, one of your target markets will be families, couples, and children. Since we have covered the basic principles of lighting patterns, ratios, angles, and qualities, you will now need to decide which approach is best to apply to your subjects.The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 4: Page 6

COUPLES

With couples, the lighting approach remains the same: what lighting will best work for this particular couple? In this photo, I chose a large light box on camera right, fill umbrella over the camera, the light box above as a hair light, and I added an edge light. If you look closely at the male, there is a nice soft highlight going down his side with a little splash on his cheek. This works well because the key light on right is still the dominant light source, forcing the eye to look at them.

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Lesson 4: Page 7

PLACE YOUR LIGHTS CAREFULLY

Now that you are taking your first portraits, I would like to share some things I see quite often with students setting up their lights for the first time and taking a portrait. I call it ‘cross lighting’. This is a common approach for photographers who have just started using lights. It is when one light is placed to one side of the subject and the second light is placed in the same position on the opposite side of the camera. This is called cross lighting because basically there are two key lights, one on each side of the camera. These lights are basically competing with each other as they both send key light that crosses each other. Essentially they both are creating highlights and shadows on the subject and the result is competing shadows and highlights and a very flat light quality.The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 4: Page 8

For this photo of the woman below left, I started with a Rembrandt pattern and no fill and it is obviously to contrasty. In the right image, I turned on the fill light, next to the camera, and set a ratio of 1.5:1. What I don’t like is the shadow under her chin and the obvious cheek wrinkles on her left cheek.

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Lesson 4: Page 9

For this business portrait of a young woman, I chose to light her with a more glamour approach by placing the key light above the camera and a white reflector below to bounce light up. I also decided to have her lean on the posing table for a more power pose.The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 4: Page 10

This light was back far enough to cover the entire sheer for a large diffused light source. A second light was placed on camera left at the background and designed to just add little details to the curtain background so it would not go black. Last, I placed a large white Light Form panel on camera left to bounce some light into the shadow side of the subject.

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