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Lesson 02 Intro to Lighting and Equipment´s archives ↓

Lesson 2: Page 01

Lesson 2: Page 02

DIGITAL
I already said it, but will say it again: “digital is the best thing that ever happened to commercial photographers!” That is how excited this revolution has made me. It is the ease of working with digital formats, the workflow, the forgiving nature of digital files, and much more than I should take time to write about. So let’s look at how your digital camera should be setup for commercial photography.The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 2: Page 03

CAMERA LENSES

Many beginning students when purchasing gear with a limited budget buy the best camera they can and the cheapest lenses to go with it. This approach is backwards! The camera just captures the data by opening and closing the shutter, but the lens delivers the sharpness. The best lenses are very sophisticated and use only the best glass as lens elements. Fast lenses would be f2.8 or wider while f4 to The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 2: Page 04

 CAMERA FEATURES


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Lesson 2: Page 05

So how do you use it? The idea is basically to get all the information of your scene to appear in between the left and right side of the histogram walls. If the graph butts up against either side of the histogram walls, clipping occurs which means any areas of the scene hitting the wall will have no detail remaining because that info has been clipped from the file. So the goal is to keep your exposure settings at an exposure that keeps both sides within the walls. If the graph hits the left wall, the clipping is occurring in the blacks. If it hits the right wall, clipping is occurring in the highlights.The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 2: Page 06

Why shoot JPEG?

The files are smaller and easily transmitted over the internet and they work fine for many applications. You can also get many more images on a CF card than RAW files. The files are processed in-camera and this means you may not have to process the files on the computer and just deliver them.The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 2: Page 07

-Custom WB. This is custom white balance and is widely used and quite useful in some cases. I don’t use it because I have a color meter. (More coming)

-Color Temp. This is where you set the WB when the camera is set to manual WB.

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-Color Space/Color Matrix. You should choose Adobe RGB since all other settings are sRGB.The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 2: Page 08

I mentioned previously about exposing to the right on your histogram and this will result in much better captures as for amount of detail. When your shadows are very dark and your histo is stacked to the left from underexposure, when you go into Photoshop to open up those shadows, noise begins to appear and this is hard to completely eliminate. Exposing to the right gives the shadows better shadow detail to start with. When metering a general scene of moderate tones, such as normal daylight outdoors, you can really just point the camera and set the exposure according to the meter. IThe content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 2: Page 09

DEPTH OF FIELD

This is basic photography 101, but in case depth of field is something that you do not fully understand, we’ll discuss it here. Depth of Field is the area in front of the focal point and the area behind the focal point that contain acceptable focus. It varies with each lens. A wide angle lens has much more depth of field than a telephoto lens. A smaller aperture has more D of  F than a wider aperture. D of F is important for each photo you take. Do you need everything in focus, or just the subject you are focusing on?The content you are trying to access is only available to members. Sorry.

Lesson 2: Page 10

This next example shows the use of a 100 mm lens on a 35 mm camera. When focused at 10’ and using f8 the D of F is roughly 9’ to 11’. Change the camera to subject distance to 20’ and the D of F increases to a range of 20’ to 23’.  Compared with the 50mm lens, you can see that at the same focal point with the same aperture, depth of field is much less.

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